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Discussion in 'General 1000RR Discussion' started by mpitman, Jun 1, 2014.

  1. mpitman

    mpitman Active Member

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    I have really lost confidence in the handling of my blade to the point that I have put it up for sale ?? I have stopped riding it quite so much as I moved work closer to me. The times that I have rode it I have had incidents that have shook me an the knock on affect is that I'm sh&&ting myself coming into a corner. What made it worse is I did Snetterton on a wet day and spun up at 95 mph on the start/finish straight and couldn't turn into the hair pin,went on to the grass at 50 mph but managed to keep it upright, that was it for me!!
    What do I do?
    Tyres are new!
    Suspension set up ?
    New bike ?

    I want to love my blade again I have had it 3 yrs now.
     
  2. fireblade_ro

    fireblade_ro New Member

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    :( that's how I felt after a bad accident - I had a few lessons (through experienced riders) and found out I wasn't cornering right because I was holding the bars too tight and my shoulders where really tense... My fear came from cycling accidents, I've hit the floor too many times to count!

    Have you considered going back to bike school/ getting a lesson about cornering and bike handling skills?
     
  3. Jimbo Vills

    Jimbo Vills God Like

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    Get the suspension set up and go and do another day in the dry IMO. Back to basics and build from the bottom up. And maybe some tuition 1/1 or just track day stuff?

    Whatever you do, hope you get ya mojo back mate.

    Selling isn't always a bad option, Giv bought a 750 and is flying on that by all accounts ;)
     
    #3 Jimbo Vills, Jun 1, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2014
  4. M3NTALIST

    M3NTALIST New Member

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    Get the suspension setup and try some really soft compound tyres if you're not already using some. If you're not getting on after that and there's no problem with the bike you might have to think more about a change of bike (not always a bad thing though).

    Good luck and I hope it comes back to you.

    Andy B
     
  5. Nick_BladeRR

    Nick_BladeRR Active Member

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    Feel your pain matey I know I had gremlins after a high speed off on the A2 when some remedial bellend sent me bouncing down the fast lane at 60mph I got away with bumps and bruises thanks to the right gear and the moron didn't stop either. Still it took me time to get over properly on my left and I had a fear of riding in the rain after that but I got on with it and soldiered on however this year I went to do another Ron Haslam track day and my god it changed my riding. I had BSB rider Dan Linfoot as my instructor and the guy is a genius he really knows how to ride fast but yet you don't feel like you're flying and it was an awesome day I got my right knee down at Coppice and my left at Goddards and no longer have the fear of sliding off the side of the bike. I would really recommend it dude as I think you might find that the problem is with the fear which, is understandable given what you went through you just gotta be able to banish the fear. Best of luck to you matey.
     
  6. Remal

    Remal It's ME
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    The most important part other then yourself with riding is the tyres and Suspension so I would look at these first

    Re coming off and knocking your confidence. I had 2 offs in 8 days back in 2007 or 08. both not my fault and the second was a rib breaker. Best bet is to get back on the bike and take your time.

    INVEST IN WETS if your doing trackdays. after I got used to wets took a session or 2. I had utmost confidence in the soakinng wet at Silverstone. braking later into corners and leaning over. So Wets are a must for your sanity and enjoyment.

    Just my view mind you :)
     
  7. Barstewardsquad

    Barstewardsquad God Like

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    Time on bike is the only real answer. I got an overtake wrong 5 years ago and it knocked my confidence badly. Going round corners I felt it would be quicker to get off and walk. At first it wasn't the corner it was the fact of not being able to see around it, but eventually I morphed into corners being the issue. Luckily I am a stubborn git and refused to give up. I have done a fair amount if training over the past couple of years: Bike Safe; Enhanced Rider Scheme; Hopp Rider Training; and British Super Bike School. I have learnt different things from all if them and I think I have finally nailed the hoodoo of my crash.

    Find some training you want to do and speak with the instructor. Most of them will be willing to tailor training for you. Also having the practical side example explained by a Pro can help the logical side of your brain deal with the issue.

    Hopefully you will solve it, but there is no shame in walking away from bikes, for ever or a short while, if your head is not in the right place.
     
  8. Chillipepper83

    Chillipepper83 Active Member

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    I loved my blade and this forum is awesome but...IMHO a thou is too much for the road/track for someone who is not pushing limits each week. Go test ride a daytona 675, enough power to manage and much more fun on track... I outride most litre bikes in the Essex countryside... :) great fun
     
  9. SIDEWAYS

    SIDEWAYS Senior Member

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    Theres nothing worse than riding a bike with wrong settings on the suspension.I found this out when I done a taster session at Brands.The front kept washing away when leaning at full lean.When that happens it is nerve wracking.I got Tagg racing to set mine up and initially it felt too firm.Now I have confidence in it and wished I'd done it earlier.Great confidence on both road and track.
    Chilli you are right, I have followed a sorted 675 daytona and boy it was quick through the twisties, even on the straights they are very fast.I worked hard keeping with him.A 675 would be my choice if I were to buy a 600cc bike.
     
  10. mpitman

    mpitman Active Member

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    Some great advice,it's the cycling that has got my into this situation Ro, I am cycling a couple of hundred miles a week where I used to do it on the blade,I do think I am holding on too tight,tensing up. I have looked at Mr Haslams race school but at the end of the day I am struggling to find the time to put the hours in in the saddle so to speak. Maybe a 899 would be the answer?
     
  11. Chillipepper83

    Chillipepper83 Active Member

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    If money is no issue an 899 would be a great bike however, a lot if doh to flick down the road.

    I did the Ron haslam school when I had the blade, both 600's and thou on one day... I had more fun chasing Dave Johnson on the 600 than the thou. I part ex'd my blade for a 675r 2 days later, never looked back!

    Feels like a bigger bike too, loads of torque in the rev range!

    All the best mate whatever u decide to do!

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Nick_BladeRR

    Nick_BladeRR Active Member

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    Not to rain on the parade here but having owned two Daytona 675's myself one of which was T3 race tuned and full supersport spec there are a couple of things that you need to be aware of with them. First off if you're buying a pre 09 one make sure it has had the Reg Rec recall done on it, secondly get some security as the Daytona is the easiest bike to steal as it has no immobilizer or alarm as standard.

    I'm 6'1 and to me the bike felt a bit small and the seating position is quite high so you feel like you're perched on top of the thing which can be disconcerting when tipping into a corner as you might feel like you're going to topple off the thing, don't worry you won't but if you're already nervous then that won't help matters. Otherwise it is a great handling bike loads of fun to ride and smooth power all the way through the rev range and yes they are very quick my supersport tuned bike had a wicked dual with a 4c8 R1 at silverstone last year he did get me on the straights but in the twisties I was straight back past him again. Perhaps try an upright bike for a while the Street Triple R is a fantastic bike same engine as the Daytona as well as front forks and brakes plus comes with loads of goodies and is a riot to ride. The upright position is great regaining that confidence and you will soon find yourself hooning round bends again go take one for a blat see what you think they come with ABS now too.
     
  13. Kentblade

    Kentblade God Like

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    Following the discussion, and personally I am intrigued by a few thoughts.

    I would suggest it will not matter what you ride if you are tensing up, and have lost confidence, no matter if it's a 125 or a 1K, its only as good or bad as its rider. (and there is no suggestion the OP is a bad rider).

    Personally I find suggestions that thous are too much for the road etc. really do not hold water, if the rider has the experience and competence, then the only thing that makes the bike go slow or fast is the amount of throttle input, and you control that by sending signals from your brain to your right wrist.

    The reality is that some riders get on better with different bikes than others, but at the end of the day you have to have confidence in the machine and for most people that starts with the front end, get that sorted and normally the rest follows.

    Crashes do dent confidence, particularly if you cannot work out or understand what caused the crash, but the only way is getting back on and rebuilding confidence, and only the rider can determine what they think is the best way to do that. If you go out with fear in your mind, then you might as well take the bus, it will not be an enjoyable experience and there is little point in putting your self through that.

    Whatever you choose, good luck matey, and I hope you get the enjoyment back.
     
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