Should I get one?

Discussion in 'New Members' started by Reg, Aug 23, 2019.

?

Should I do it?

  1. No way, you'd have to be insane.

    6.3%
  2. Do it, best decision you'll ever make!!

    93.8%
  1. Reg

    Reg New Member

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    Morning folks, looking for advice.

    I feel the answer to this will go very much one way or the other. I've always loved the '06 Repsol Blade. I am now able to buy one as a third vehicle, so it will only be used on nice days, but here's the rub. The last time I rode a bike it was 25 years ago and I don't even have a bike licence yet. Doing a 5 day course next month.

    Am I being stupid thinking I could use a blade as a first proper bike? I'm old enough to know my limits and am certainly past the boy racer stage. I have to be honest it will be the Repsol Blade or nothing and I doubt I'd bother getting a smaller machine as its a Blade I want rather than 'a motorbike'.

    I guess I'm just asking if I ride sensibly can the Blade make a usable first bike?

    Many thanks for any input and hopefully there wont be too many 'Are you fecking nuts?' replies!!

    Reg.
     
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  2. Spygoat

    Spygoat Active Member

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    Hi and welcome!

    Of course it can make a good first bike. if you haven't ridden in 25 years, I would venture a guess you're not some hot-headed kid. Use the sensibility God gave you and you'll be fine.
     
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  3. Boothman

    Boothman Active Member

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    Hi @Reg and welcome to the forum - that is a conundrum for you.

    In my opinion it all ultimately depends on your confidence. everyone will tell you that the blade is a very forgiving/easy to ride machine and in many ways the under seat exhaust version is arguably the more comfortable out of the lot. Some may say you’re better starting with a CBR600RR of the same year as its less powerful, but they’ve got plenty of umph and will take off virtually as quick as the blade. It all comes down to your right wrist on that front.

    Have you looked at the difference in insurance and cost of machine is probably the more relevant concern assuming you’re not a money is no object regular guy. Whatever you go with good luck and take it easy. I’d also strongly suggest once you’ve got the bike and licence you look to do another course on it ASAP. The one for passing the test is just for that with a smattering of other info - you will want to do one on real world riding and staying out of trouble. Its a lot less painful and expensive to learn the lessons of others than suffering ones of your own.
     
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  4. Lozzy

    Lozzy God Like

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    Get it Reg, the Blade is probaby lighter, better balanced and easier to ride than a lot of lesser cc bikes. At the end of the day it's just got a bit more on the throttle, and its you that controls that ;)
    They're pretty bomb proof and the 06 Repsol is a lovely looking bike...so a massive thumbs up from me :)

    Oh ps...I had a 600 rr for commuting at one point and personally I think the blade is easier to ride...not up and down the gears as much for a kick off...and i think i was sillier on the 600 so smaller doesn't always equate to better
     
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  5. nigelrb

    nigelrb Elite Member

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    Hi and welcome.

    As the old saying goes: 'Once you've ridden a bike you'll never forget how.' That applies whether its pedals or 998 cc. All control is down to you and your right wrist. The bike is easy to adapt to. I, and many others, have returned to bikes in a similar manner. Takes no time at all to reacquaint. Sure, the first few miles are full of nerves, but that's more about competing with traffic rather than getting to grips with the bike.

    As stated above, the 04 - 07 models are a comfortable ride and reliable bike that if in good condition will hold its value well.

    I don't subscribe to the theory 'get a 600 first' (for a mature/experienced rider). It is akin to having a night with a latex lover before taking on a real woman (or man if that's your bag).;)
     
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  6. Blade runner 1

    Blade runner 1 Active Member

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    Hi and welcome. If you get your license and can get it insured why not. Being sensible is the key, the blade will happily potter along at 30mph in sixth gear and pull away from that no problem. A great choice of first sports bike, comfortable, easy to ride, forgiving, smooth power delivery.
     
  7. dmc12

    dmc12 New Member

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    What kind of bikes did you used to ride 25 years ago? I think you'd be fine getting a blade first up if you're so minded - although I wouldn't take it out in the wet until you've properly got used to it. That back gets lively, trust me!
     
  8. Mattie660

    Mattie660 Elite Member

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    Statistically this is a danger group - the older rider who has not ridden since their youth, and now can afford the toys that they want.

    Relatively fine if your are moving up to a Porsche, after all it will not be such a huge jump in skills required, from getting out of your current car - walking across the forecourt and getting in to a Porsche.

    Motorbikes are different. The skills gap - from getting out of a family salon car and getting on to a serious sportsbike - are enormous.

    May I suggest you get a Porsche instead ?;)
     
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  9. dmc12

    dmc12 New Member

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    Fair point re the skills required - maybe consider a couple of days at a track school (CSS or Ron Haslam etc) once you've got the bike? They might seem expensive, but I considered it cheap life insurance to be honest and have done 4 levels of CSS since getting my licence in January last year (after last riding moto-X bikes 25 years earlier). Passing your test doesn't teach you how to go round a corner without target fixating on a tree after all.
     
    #9 dmc12, Aug 23, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
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  10. Reg

    Reg New Member

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    I totally understand your thinking however I spent my 30s in a Skyline R34, Evos and an M5 so I've pretty much ticked the fast car box! I would 100% be getting further training if I get the bike, I want to live long enough to enjoy it after all!!
     
  11. Reg

    Reg New Member

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    I won't be venturing anywhere if its so much as cloudy outside! Got cars for those days and not nearly enough bike experience.
     
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  12. Reg

    Reg New Member

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    I have the confidence to know my limits finally! I really don't want a smaller bike if its no easier to ride and isn't what I want. The cost of insurance and bike isn't much of an issue within reason and again I wouldn't take a route I didn't need to just to save a few quid.

    Further training would certainly be had.

    Thanks for your thoughts.
     
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  13. Reg

    Reg New Member

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    Thanks for everyone's input so far.

    I'm pleased to see it's mostly positive with some kind concern for my welfare thrown in!!

    I have no intention of thinking I'll be a riding God the day after passing my test and will certainly get further training. It sounds like I've chosen the right machine though.

    I have a feeling I'll be joining you all out there.

    Reg
     
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  14. Spygoat

    Spygoat Active Member

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    @Reg come on out for a ride, I'll take it easy on you!

    But seriously, as a motorcycle safety instructor and track day riding coach, the best advice is to ride your own ride, get acclimated and comfortable before you try to step it up any.
     
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  15. Boothman

    Boothman Active Member

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    Then get your licence, buy the blade, sign up for training and bloody love it :D
     
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  16. Barstewardsquad

    Barstewardsquad God Like

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    The blade is capable of more than most of us on this forum. Difference is most of us had a few years of recent experience before getting on a litre bike. I don't want to offend you but a litre bike, even one 13 years old, will be a lot different to what you were used to 25 years ago. It will bite you if you get it wrong, and it's bite can be nasty.

    Personally I would say go get your license, ride a 600 for a year or two and then get a blade, r1 etc.

    Of course if you used to race 25 years ago then go for it ;)
     
  17. bazzashadow

    bazzashadow Active Member

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    My first bike on the road was a FJ1200:D
     
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  18. Blade runner 1

    Blade runner 1 Active Member

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    Living proof that it can be done, excuse me while I go and finish that bottle of wine.:)
     
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  19. Mattie660

    Mattie660 Elite Member

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    I think you should ease back into it starting with one of these:

    Mind you - might be just as likely to break an ankle on this !:D

    Scoot.png
     
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  20. Nytol

    Nytol Active Member

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    I got into biking later in life, took my direct access at 37 (5 years ago), my first bike was a V twin KLV1000, which was not the ideal 1st bike, but fine for me.

    6 weeks after passing my test I bought my 05 Fireblade.

    Since then I have ridden the majority of interesting superbikes, adventure bikes and nakeds, and the 05 Fireblade still ranks as one of the easiest, and nicest to ride, (hence the fact I just bought another).

    The power is smooth and linear, no need to be revved hard, decent brakes, excellent handling, and comfortable.
     
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