TT????

Discussion in 'Racing & Bike Sport' started by yorkshiregooner, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. yorkshiregooner

    yorkshiregooner Active Member

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    I'm just surfing the usual forums n social media sites
    All the usual fuss about the TT.
    Some calling for the TT to be banned or regulated, comparing to how many deaths on mt Everest to the TT etc etc
    Now I think I speak for ever biker going, when some dies on a bike we all feel it, we all know the risks and the danger. Personally I don't think I will ever go to the TT, but that's just my choice.
    Now to why I posted this, all I have seen and read is how the riders know the risks, except the danger and know they can be seconds away from death, but what about the heartache he leaves behind?
    The mum, dad, wife and children? I can't imagine what they go through and hopefully I never will, I would imagine it's small consolation saying he died doing something he loved.
    Don't get me wrong l'm not for banning it, I just feel for the people left to pick up the pieces.
     
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  2. Givover

    Givover God Like

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    It's something that crosses your mind every time you wave goodbye .....But its a drug dude and most are hooked.:rolleyes:
     
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  3. Jimbo Vills

    Jimbo Vills God Like

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    Im pretty sure not one bloke crosses the line thinking what if...

    And as selfish as it sounds, thinks about the consequence he leaves behind. All for their own goals.

    IMO it's a different mentality that the rest of us don't operate on....
     
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  4. MrB

    MrB God Like

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    It is addictive, a few years ago I witnessed a death of a spectator he collided with a lady on the school run we dragged the 4x4 off his body the amount of people affected, families. A local guy died recently. I stay with a family on the island and we were saying today it's a strange and unique thing that's been left to happen forgot what I was saying just back from bushys
     
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  5. exfire

    exfire Elite Member

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    I understand what you are saying Yorkshiregooner. The people left behind have all the suffering and aftermath, in a way it could be considered to be selfish to put your life at risk in the pursuit of pleasure.

    In a way though, it is not that much different to someone who puts their life at risk by their everyday lifestyle ie eats too much, drinks alcohol too much, takes recreational drugs or fails to look after their health in other ways or drives like an idiot. The end result can be premature death and leaving others to pick up the pieces............it just is not so instant.

    My ex's used to hate me firefighting, although it was a job as such, I used to enjoy the lifestyle and risk, there was no way I was going to give it up.

    My partner hates me riding and worries every time I go out, but I will continue riding all the time I physically can, I love it so much.....I have made sure the family is financially covered though. I believe in fate, when your numbers up it's up, no matter what you do or do not do.
     
  6. Remal

    Remal It's ME
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    Personally I feel we are being told too much what we can and cannot do. Big brother? The family's of anyone who dies at the TT or road racing must be aware of what could happen.

    John Mcguiness, family kids wife but he still go's every year.

    I would like to go to the TT one year. Sooner than later.

    Always horrid to hear anyone dying at the TT but this happens and motorsport is dangerous.

    What would happen if country's decided to ban motorbikes as they are far more dangerous than cars. or banning old cars that don't have crumple zones, 20 air bags NCAP 5 star rating.

    I feel that anyone who goes into road racing understands what could happen.

    Let it be there choice.

    But just my view
     
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  7. Ratser

    Ratser Well-Known Member

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    It is no different to whatever job you have.
    If you die at your work, then what is left behind has to pick up the pieces and the heartache.
    If you watch Closer To The Edge and you see Paul Dobbs wife, she is how I imagine most racers families to be like.
    Doesn't make it any easier though.
    And if you watch Road, and you see the reactions and comments from Robert's wife, Joey's wife and then their mother.
    With Michael saying the hardest thing about them both dying was seeing his poor Granny.

    I guess the racers life is a bit selfish in that respect.
     
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  8. 1000rr73

    1000rr73 Active Member

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    Agree with a lot of what has been said here. There certainly is an element of being selfish, but then we all are too as we ride bikes, maybe not at the TT, but its risky still right? Don't know what the stats look like per rider, per mile or whatever, but my commute can be hairy sometimes.

    You do only get one life though, and it goes quick, so I'm a firm believer that if you've found something you love and it doesn't hurt others then enjoy it. Death is never easy, and whilst I've lost one friend due to his love of bikes, I've lost more from other things like illnesses, accidents etc. when your time is up its up, just be careful, and be careful in your cars, crossing the road, with the amount you drink, with the stairs you climb, with the planes you jump out of, with the windows you clean......
     
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  9. Barstewardsquad

    Barstewardsquad God Like

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    They know the risks, as do we when we go out on our bikes. Me, the wife and step-kids are only together because the wife and me met through bikes, but I have always told her that I would stop riding if she asked me to.. Every time I go out on the bike on my own the last thing I do before getting on the bike is to sign* "I Love You" to the wife, even if she can't see me she knows I do it, soppy maybe but you never know.




    * Wife knows a bit of BSL as she used to Child Mind some special needs kiddies years ago and she taught me a (very) few things.
     
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  10. kpone

    kpone Moderator
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    I admit that I cringe whenever I hear the 'died doing what he loved' platitude. It's not that I doubt the sincerity of the utterer, it's just that I find it a bit 'pat'. A quick response reaction to defend the notion of motorcycling against the inevitable backlashing query as to why we do it. 'He died doing one of the things he loved. Things like watching his family grow, having a beer with his mates, watching the sunset over the sea...'

    I'm not that one dimensional, and personally, there's things I would rather be remembered as loving than just the thing that killed me.
     
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  11. t0m541

    t0m541 Senior Member

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    Scott Redding is in the news with this comment,
    "It's like death race, all the riders that finish are relieved to finish in one piece and see their loved ones."

    As most who read the news will know, Scott knew the 2 riders who died at the TT personally and his comments come from how he feels..

    He also added
    "The bikes are far too advanced for road racing nowadays. Would you drive your car at 132mph through a village?"

    Of course he is entitled to his opinion and free to air his views...however....it's these kind of comments that the nanny state flag wavers are going to be latching on to and repeating ad-infinitum in the little debates on what is safe for the people.

    I can't help feeling that there will be a few within the racing community....especially the more seasoned racers who will be grimacing at Scott being so public on the subject.

    No you wouldn't drive your car at 132mph through a village...unless it was a closed road, properly marshalled and controlled.

    IIRC Guy Martin said that short track racing held no interest for him as it was too safe and the roads gave him that buzz of high speeds past everyday objects and that one wrong move and it's game over.
    I guess that mindset is what drives those who race the TT and other road courses to push harder and keep on doing what they do, those who are closest to them know this and will accept that the passion for that thrill and will to achieve is what makes them who they are...for better or worse..
     
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  12. ozzer76

    ozzer76 Member

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    I was talking with some staff in Hunts today (the dealer who provided M.Dunlop with his 600rr) and we were talking about Reddings comments etc.

    Redding should be careful what he says because he is a public figure but I respect the fact he knew the guys personally and he was pretty much saying he didn't want to ride the parade lap as his mates had just died there. Fair enough. Calling it a death race is unfair though as the riders don't go to risk their lives, they go to live their lives doing the thing they love.

    What we did talk about though is the speed of the bikes these days. When you consider the Superstock did a lap just 1-2 seconds off it's Superbike counterpart you realise just how hard this is going to be to control. F1 have done it but I cannot see manufacturers accepting a control which will make out of the crate bikes slower. It doesn't make business sense. Maybe some control should be put in place to make them any faster than they already are. But given how good the Superstocks are, what difference would this make?
     
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  13. t0m541

    t0m541 Senior Member

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    What that young chap, (Mr Redding), shouldn't forget is that motorcycles and motorcycle racing is an industry, with the sole aim of selling motorcycles to the public.
    MotoGp & the TT as well as WSB and BSB are huge advertising platforms for their products..
    He works/rides for one of the major, if not the biggest motorcycle manufacturers in the world, the last thing they need is one of their high profile employees making bold public statements on his personal opinions about a race where they have a huge financial commitment..TT Legends for example..and giving ammunition to those who would stop such an event if given half the chance..

    Like I said before..I think there might be some quiet words spoken in young ears within a certain MotoGP teams office to be more careful with social statements.
     
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  14. Ratser

    Ratser Well-Known Member

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    Redding did obviously know one of the chaps very well who passed away.
    However his reason for not attending was some over the top reactions from some TT fans, and a rather straight to the point tweet by Josh Brookes (which I don't blame. Josh for, as a rider and competitor).
    I have no axe to grind with Scott, but his comments, as has been said already, will be jumped on by all and sundry.
    Most with no interest in Motorsport never mind the TT to either have the bikes slowed down, or have the TT instill further stringent H&S measures. Maybe bubble wrapping the riders or something.
    Perhaps on reflection Scott's reasoning in his statement is his true reasoning, not wanting to go over where his friend was killed. But that statement doesn't tell the whole truth about why his decision was made.
     
  15. HRCTrev09

    HRCTrev09 Well-Known Member

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    It's always shocking when riders are killed no matter where it is! This time of year it's always worst with the NW200,the TT and the start of our biking season But I feel life is way to short and we should all live our life to the full!
    No matter what we choose to do, as long as enjoy what we are doing that's living our lives!
    I've lost 4 friends and colleagues to cancer over the last 2yrs :( the youngest being just 30yrs didn't smoke or drink and she left two small children! Her life cut short in a very short space of time, so very tragic!!:(
    I think it more important what we do with our lives rather than how we loose it! We should really concentrate getting the most out of life you just never know what's round that next corner!..
     
    #15 HRCTrev09, Jun 5, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2014
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  16. Marion

    Marion Well-Known Member

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    Well said Trev. Life is too short to think of "what ifs" make the most of today cos there may not be a tomorrow. Regardless of what you do or where you are if your time is up its goodbye.
     
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  17. HRCTrev09

    HRCTrev09 Well-Known Member

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    I know biking ain't for everyone wether through fear of what they've been told or losing someone they knew but it's the pleasure us bikers get thats seldom understood! As long as we stay safe and are not reckless, know you limits and don't take unnecessary risks then we should be the next generation of old bikers that's been riding for countless happy years
     
  18. Nick_BladeRR

    Nick_BladeRR Active Member

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    I have to comment on this seeing that I sent a tweet personally to mr Redding after reading his tweets on the night that Bomber passed away there is a time and a place for airing such views and twitter on the eve of motorsport losing a beloved son is not the time or the place.

    I'll make no secret that I've not been a fan of Mr Redding for sometime it appears to me that he is in the wrong game as he appears to rapidly disappearing up his own arse as a pretty boy who's more interested in his brolly dolly than mind blowingly awesome opportunity he has been given to ride in MotoGP. Contrast his character with Bradley Smith now there is a young man who will go far a young kid who is grateful for where he is and doesn't see it as a god given right like Mr Redding appears to do so.

    Now I understand what it is like to lose a close friend in the blink of eye made worse when you are first on the scene of the accident too images that will haunt me until the day I die. However unlike Mr Redding I did not say that's it I will never ride that road again I ride that road with pride and give a nod at the spot when my friend passed away every time I ride along it. Personally if I was Mr Redding I would have made a public statement apologising for my comments and gone to the TT wearing my friends number with Pride and done the lap to honor him even though he passed away there he was doing something that he loved at the time.

    I have to tip my hat to Josh Brookes such a talented guy and he calls it how he sees it no time for bullshit and that is exactly how I am. Personally I think Scott was wrong to make those comments and whilst his statement may also be true it also smacks of cowardness about how he's opened his north and now hiding from the consequences of his actions. Perhaps somebody should teach him about cause and effect how every action has a reaction.

    Now I've no doubt my words have angered some people reading this but to put it best I'll quote my favourite tweet of the week from Josh Brookes " Opinions are like arseholes everybody has one I have listened to yours and now you have to listen to mine"
     
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  19. Ratser

    Ratser Well-Known Member

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    Nick, I agree with your second paragraph.
    Have noticed it as I follow Redding on twitter, and he does come across as being (or wanting to be) a pretty boy.
    The fact he seems to have this Beiber like following who abused Josh Brookes, mostly females too, seems to back this up.
    Good rider that he may be, but a long way off being a Champion.
    And nowhere near the hero status (to me anyway) that any rider who rides that TT course is.

    As a racer with an obvious large following, and being seen as racing in the premier class of motorcycle racing, his comments could have been put across better, or better still just not commented at all.
    Bizarrely he likely makes more finishing mid to lower pack in Moto GP than most of the TT riders do, which is pretty shameful IMO (not his fault granted).
     
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