Anyone in here do any club racing?

Discussion in 'Racing & Bike Sport' started by TrackdayCharlie, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. TrackdayCharlie

    TrackdayCharlie New Member

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    As per title. Me and a pal (both on 1000RRs) are having a dabble in a few rounds with NG road racing.

    Always handy to meet more people.
     
  2. robinh73

    robinh73 Well-Known Member

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    Nice one, enjoy it! NG are a great club, well run, good variety of circuits and always decent grids too. Just be prepared for the bank to start hating you!
     
  3. TrackdayCharlie

    TrackdayCharlie New Member

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    Haa haa yea I'm already feeling the financial pain and I haven't started yet, but you got to spend it on something!

    I'm open to all and any hints and tips.
     
  4. robinh73

    robinh73 Well-Known Member

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    Best tip, don't scrimp on tyres and get the suspension sorted before any other upgrades. Have you got spare wheels for wets too? I always had a separate set of tools for doing a front and rear wheel change totally independent of everything else. It just meant that you could have one person changing the front wheel while another did the rear wheel, so a quick wheel change could be sorted out. Admittedly, this was of more use on the roads, but still handy for a quick change if it started to rain and you were on the wrong tyres.
    Get a decent quality tyre pressure gauge with a 90 degree head on it (preferably old school mechanical rather than digital one which needs batteries and will go flat when you least need it), rather than a 45 degree one which is a sod to do on a front wheel with discs in the way.
    Wait until the last minute before heading to the holding area, so say the second call. Keep your tyres in the warmers as long as possible. Also, don't forget to unplug your warmers when you do remove them, they WILL burn out if you don't.
    Between races, check as many fasteners and allen bolts as possible. I have a list of things like tyre pressures (hot and cold), torque settings (for wheel changes) and race times on the lid of my tool box. Keep a spare oil filter and enough oil for a full change, keep an eye on your brake fluid and again put the best you can in there, they are useful things brakes and need looking after.
    Most importantly, go and have fun, don't get too worked up by results initially, but use the first few meets to learn about the paddock, how it works and learning how to get on the brakes last and on the gas first. It is a learning curve from day one and you will never stop learning, but you are about to start doing the best thing ever.
     
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  5. TrackdayCharlie

    TrackdayCharlie New Member

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    Lots of great advice there!

    After a few years of track days I've decided my favourite (dry) tyres are Bridgestone V02s, so I'll be on them. I have full K-tech front and rear, and I have had it set-up and fettled with to a point where I feel happy with it. I guess my only concern is if the weather goes wet. Last year I had a wet track day on it and it was horrible. Ron Haslem happened to stroll by and chatted so he gave me some advice on wet settings so I took it and nearly lost the front, so that didn't work too well! Do most people normally have wet settings written down? Just an experience things. I'm a confident track rider in the dry but in the wet I think I'd be pretty embarrassing!

    I have a tidy pressure gauge but it's a 45, so I've purchased some 90 degree valves, I'm hoping this will stop the burnt hands. My only concern is that they didn't cost a lot, which I guess makes sense as there isn't much too them, but I'd hate lose out because of something cheap.

    I've got a white paint pen and plan to mark all critical fastners with it, I had a close call with a loose caliper a year or two back!

    Another question, might be a no-brainer I guess but as you already mentioned....money. Brake guard? Necessary?
     
  6. robinh73

    robinh73 Well-Known Member

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    Racing in the rain is actually brilliant fun and I found that once I had got my head round it, it is just as awesome as in the dry. As for settings, generally a softer set up is more forgiving but I tend to leave it as it is for short circuits, but on the roads I found a change was good, especially at Oliver's Mount and the Ulster GP.
    One thing, you won't be allowed to run 90 degree valves I think and they will also require metal valve caps, so get a load of those in, as the scrutineers will fail you on that.
    As brake guard is needed for scrutineering and you won't get on the grid with out one. Same for a rain light, you have to have one.
    The white paint pen is good, I marked my foot peg and clip on bolts with it, just a quick and easy check to do.
    Don't forget a shark fin for the chain and make sure it is close to the sprocket, as they can get picky if it is not close enough to the sprocket.
    Anything else, fire away and I will do my best to answer!
     
  7. TrackdayCharlie

    TrackdayCharlie New Member

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    Very interesting to hear you would leave it the same. Perhaps that would be a better solution for me also.
    Interesting about the valves, I didn't see anything about it in the ACU book, in fact I thought it was common on race bikes! The metal caps I had been told about and forgot, so thank you for that.

    I had a chat with the scrut guys when I did my licence and they told me a brake guard wasn't a requirement. I guess it would be daft not to just get one anyone.

    I've got the shark fin.

    Also, I've found even more reason to hate the Hondas oil dipstick now I have had to lockwire it. I'm pretty anal with things like oil and tyre pressures, so having to sort the lockwire out just to check the oil each time is a bit painful.
     
  8. robinh73

    robinh73 Well-Known Member

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    Interesting about the brake guard, it may just be on the roads then that it is required. I haven't raced short circuit for a few years now, as I have just been doing the roads.
    With lockwiring the oil filter, best method I have found is to get a large jubilee clip and have this lock wired permanently to a lug point on the engine block. Saves having to re-wire the thing every time. Also, use only the genuine oil filters or should I say, avoid K&N ones, as there are so many people who have reported them fail at the nut attachment, resulting oil spewing over the rear tyre. Not good!
    Suspension set up is crucial, so check your rear spring is right for your weight, same with the forks. You will generally find a decent base setting by speaking to a suspension guy at the circuit. Try to take in what the bike is doing in the first few meetings, is it turning in too soon, too late etc etc. As you get faster, you will find you will alter settings but don't get too wrapped up in this to start with, just enjoy the experience. The starts are just awesome, one of the most pulse raising experiences you will ever get!
    With tyres, get the warmers on as soon as you have finished your race (you probably know this anyway) and similarly, get your warmers on asap in the morning to get heat into the actual wheel rim, not just the tyre itself. As I said on my list I had tyre pressures for all my tyres written and daft simple stuff like writing the cold psi in blue and hot in red just helps if you are rushing. Worth getting a clock too and a small white board for jotting race times etc down. All simple stuff that makes it easier and takes the stress out of it. Have you got a generator and awning?
     
  9. TrackdayCharlie

    TrackdayCharlie New Member

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    I too have heard about the K&N filters! Have a look at the picture if you will, it's similar to what I've done for the sump, oil cap and dipstick.

    I was sorting my oil filter out yesterday. I've been using Hi-Flo ones for a few years and touch wood no complaints.

    I've got a trusty old genny, a Honda one of course! My pal I'm racing with has a good quality awning/tent. I'm also pushing for my old many to come and 'support' me with his caravan and awning!
     

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  10. robinh73

    robinh73 Well-Known Member

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    That looks ideal with the oil filter lock wiring, no worries there at all. Get a spare jubilee clip just in case. I think I had more spares than I care to imagine, but they are so handy. Another daft thing that comes in useful more often than I thought is getting a length of nylon rod. It is great for making spacers, washers etc on the go and also a thinner length makes a great tool for knocking out wheel spindles, so get a couple of lengths of them from here:
    https://www.directplastics.co.uk/nylon-6-rod

    Hi Flo filters are spot on, I have used them with no issues and have many friends who do too.

    It sounds as though you are all set and ready to go. Can't beat a mate with caravan and awning, well worth it.
     
  11. TrackdayCharlie

    TrackdayCharlie New Member

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    Lot's of great advice there. Especially the nylon rod, I think that's a great idea. I can just imagine how helpful that might be. Thanks.
     
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