Does Forum advice affect mechanics livelihood?

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by nigelrb, Jun 10, 2019.

  1. nigelrb

    nigelrb Senior Member

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  2. Barstewardsquad

    Barstewardsquad God Like

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    Do internet forums affect IT people livelyhood? If you want a job where people can't just learn lots about it from the internet then maybe being a bike/car/computer fixer isn't the best career path.

    If people feel confident enough after reading a forum to fix the bike, car whatever then they would in the past have used a Haynes manual, spoke to a friend, or watched someone doing the actual job so they do it themselves next time.

    Personally there is a limit on how much I will try just using forums and youtube.
     
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  3. steve750

    steve750 Active Member

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    As above!!! We all read to gain better knowledge and sometimes try within our capabilities.
     
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  4. Cream_Revenge

    Cream_Revenge New Member

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    Probably make a fortune fixing fuck ups.
     
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  5. Cream_Revenge

    Cream_Revenge New Member

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    Anyway, I like getting the spanners out, it's my form of meditation.
     
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  6. nigelrb

    nigelrb Senior Member

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    I like getting the Mr Sheen out, it's my form of meditation.:D
     
  7. Marc

    Marc New Member

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    In my case it's probably good for the industry. I see something, think it looks easy, have a go, cross thread/ruin everything, pay a mechanic to fix my mess and the original problem. I could try to replace a bulb and wreck the head gasket in the process!
     
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  8. nigelrb

    nigelrb Senior Member

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    And a very valid point @Marc .

    I think many of us might have attacked a job with supreme confidence only to find that we were severely lacking and ended up resorting to the gurus. The interesting offshoot of that is that there are times that it would have been quicker and cheaper to go direct to a tech rather than attempt the job ourself. :)
     
  9. Grooveski

    Grooveski New Member

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    There still seem to be about as many workshops around these days(or around here anyway) as pre-internet. Not really an answer to the question but maybe a guage...

    There are other factors too in that period - Service intervals have pretty much doubled, but then now it takes twice as long to get into anything so I guess that balances out a bikes time in a the workshop a bit.

    Forums are great for finding out if problems are model issues or one-offs, and fantastic for seeing a variety of different solutions.
    ...but I reckon where the internet really shines is for manuals. :) It's so nice having torque settings for everything instead of just going by what the last similar bike you happened to have a manual for was.
    Recently refreshed a couple of little KXs. Would never have dreamed of buying manuals for them, it'd all have been guesswork.
    ...but when they're just a mouseclick away they do make life easier.

    ...and parts diagrams - I'll bet dealers don't miss the days of firing up the microfisch reader every time someone couldn't read their own "which bolt goes where" notes. :p
     
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  10. nigelrb

    nigelrb Senior Member

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    Good response.

    You might sense that the original poster on the thread I posted presented as somewhat 'selfish' and interested only in his view.

    Great point about parts diagrams etc. I frequently look up Fowlers for assembly guidance (most recently when installing Chinese fairings) and as a result actually purchased items from them. On that basis, they GAINED income as a result of forum advice.

    I think the present price for a 2017 -2019 Blade Workshop Manual is in excess of £45.00. I know a member on here has one. I haven't seen the current manuals offered as a free download, BUT, it was a bonus to find the 2008 - 11 available. Might that cost the industry money? Not sure, because at forty-plus quid I wouldn't buy one anyway. And herein lays the BIG question: Has Haynes manuals cost manufacturers, and the repair industry, a heap of income? These questions could be never ending.

    On forums we are enthusiasts. The general commuter type owner will generally leave his bike with a workshop and pay whatever is asked for repairs. So yes, the dealers/service centres will always survive.
     
  11. Grooveski

    Grooveski New Member

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    I blame that Marshall Cavendish "Road Bike" series back in the eighties. After they showed Honda owners how to change their own rectifiers the industry was never the same again. ;)
     
  12. sps170373

    sps170373 Moderator
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    Dealers don’t help themselves with 3 week waiting times for service/repair work! Who wants to wait that long?

    I got fed up with dealer service a long time ago, took them 3 attempts to get the dipped and main beam aligned after an accident, if they can’t get something as simple as that right first time, would you trust them to do a valve check?

    They are only interested in margins these days because as soon as you walk out the door they couldn’t care a less
     
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  13. Grooveski

    Grooveski New Member

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    Was glad to find the 04-05 Blade manual as a download. Got a paper copy with the bike but I hate getting manuals dirty.
    Obviously it happens and I'm not OCD but I do hate doing it, which can lead to time wasting handwashes.
    ...but I don't appear to give two hoots what state my hands are in when I use a mouse.

    So paper for pre-job read-throughs and PDF for grubby mitt time. Manual heaven. :)
     
  14. F1CT1C10U5

    F1CT1C10U5 Active Member

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    Short answer: no
     
  15. nigelrb

    nigelrb Senior Member

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  16. Blade runner 1

    Blade runner 1 Active Member

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    Sharing knowledge should be actively encouraged, it wouldn’t surprise me if mechanics are searching forums for for valuable information.
     
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  17. BoroRich

    BoroRich Elite Member

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    As a general rule I imagine that shifty mechanics, car salespeople, mattress salespeople, electrical goods salespeople, crap hotel owners, crap restaurant owners, poor hire car companies etc etc etc etc all hate the internet.

    The net is often abused and can be an irritating place but it's empowered a lot of people and put paid to some of the old ways of doing business. People know that garages, mechanics etc CAN be out to shaft them out of money for poor quality work. That's why people check with other owners on forums. As we all know, the solution to your problem is very often a known issue with the bike, car, microwave etc. A quick ask can often mean not having to ask a pro who'll just make up a bunch of stuff that 'needs fixing'.

    You can then decide whether you want to have a crack at it yourself or pay the pro. In my experience the pros often aren't much better than you, they just have the tools to do the job and are quicker at it due to experience.

    When you're young you tend to be time rich and money poor so you might be more inclined to have a go. As you get older the reverse is often true. I used to pull my bikes to bits. Now I can't really be arsed so if it's anything much more complicated than an oil change or brake pads, off it goes to the mechanic.

    Problem is.....finding a decent, conscientious one is easier said than done. The last time I got my bike back from a mechanic the clutch lever had been put back on so that it was hitting the bodywork on full lock, there was a scratch on the swingarm that I know wasn't there before (but can't prove) and there were 2 bolts missing. One was one of the large fairing bolts so the right hand main fairing was flapping around.

    I'd have done the job better but it'd have taken me ages.
     
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  18. bazzashadow

    bazzashadow Active Member

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    I have never seen a poor mechanic.
    So they must be doing ok
    The rates they charge are ridiculous and that’s why I work on my own bike and the fact that when I brought the blade they over filled it with oil :( I know I would not of done that;)
     

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