Suspension set up

Discussion in 'General 1000RR Discussion' started by LowSide76, Jul 6, 2020.

  1. LowSide76

    LowSide76 New Member

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    hi guys just wondering about suspension set up.
    I paid for.it setting up but they didn't use a tape measure to set it up but instead asked me some questions and fitted a zip tie to the fork.
    Then I was sent for a quick 20 min ride and came back.
    Can you set up the bike this way or is it better to measure?
     
  2. Gaffa22

    Gaffa22 Well-Known Member

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    Yes you can set it up that way, personally I prefer to measure the sag settings and do a baseline setting, then use the zip tie and tyre wear to fine tune, although the zip tie only really confirms if you are braking hard enough to use up the travel.
     
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  3. Jcbmally

    Jcbmally Active Member

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    How does it feel to you ??? If it is good then great if not have a chat with them. Have you thought of having a go yourself ?
    Various factors are used to set up suspension not just a zip tie. Ride height, sag front/rear, pre-load/rebound are all set up around weight and riding style. It is quite surprising how different a set up can be just around the riding style of an individual. I would also make adjustments after riding on the same stretch of road as the feel can change.
    All you need to do is make small adjustments, try it, return to standard settings if no good and repeat until you hit the sweet spot.
     
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  4. Paul Longstaff

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    Get yourself on youtube.
    Search dave moss, he isn't perfect but will give a good amount of common sense in how to approach setting up.
     
  5. LowSide76

    LowSide76 New Member

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    It felt a lot better at first but now doesn't feel cracking tbh.
    May have a play with rebound and compression
     
  6. simon p

    simon p New Member

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    Like others say watch Dave Moss videos, then have a go at setting it up yourself, not hard, a tape measure, pen and paper, that's all you need, you may need someone to help you while you sit om the bike with all your gear on, I always use a zip tie on the forks just to see how much travel i'm using,
     
  7. icedmind

    icedmind Active Member

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    yes but as its by feel you'd better DIY, answering question is basically tell you things that you'd find on internet. It's too long to explain all in one post but i am in the process of writing servicing BPF and some quick tips on finding right setup following oil change(yes it change setting even with just oil change)

    in short, assuming you are not going to change spring and for road riding

    1) put fork/shock to factory setting for compression and rebound

    2) set static sag: https://www.cycleworld.com/sport-rider/ask-geek-set-your-static-sag/

    3) bring a screw driver with you and go for ride, dial in forks first before moving on to shock(8/10 people would be fine with stock rear shock setting if rear sag is right)

    4) find a very quiet road and do some hard braking, say 70(for legal sake)-20mph if the forks dive too much then increase compression (harder) if front is solid then decrease the compression (softer), you are look at a consistence dive loading the front end under hard braking, i judge this by how heavy i feel on my wrists

    too much compression will decrease your forks small bump sensitivity, i'd go as little as possible for fork compression

    5) if the front end come up too quickly after hard braking then increase rebound (harder); too slow then decrease(softer)- very unlikely

    (go with 1/2 a turn at a time, make frequent stop to adjust, when you are close then go 1/4 turn and 1/8 turn to fine tune)

    6) on bumpy roads if its bouncing you up and down around then increase rebound for suspension to return to full travel slower (harder), if the front end come up too slowly after a bump then decrease rebound(softer)

    This should get you close to 70-80% of ideal setup for road on stock suspension

    7) for advance riding/ tight hard twisty road or track (trail brake situation) then follow the following troubleshoot guide

    [​IMG]

    8) verify travel used (by dust on sanction or cable tie method- do not tie it in hard and remove after you finish your setup, it will kill dust seals) increase/decrease preload with account for compression and rebound until you use almost full travel, i would say if you are not wheeling and slamming front down a lot then 20-25mm unused travel is good for road (more if you like to stunt and use your blade rallying), I tend to aim for about 10-15mm with adjustment of fork oil level to get a more linear feel at then end of the stroke


    Be aware oil age, oil weight, oil brands even, temperature, road surface, tyre pressure (suspension work only when bike is upright and low lean) will change handling

    you will know when you get close as you will feel that the bike grips far better in corners, the ride is more comfortable and you can run higher tyre pressure to make the bike turn quicker and your tyre will also last longer. for example on road i am running 33-36psi F/39-42 psi R on stock tyre size, bike turn plenty quick enough with stable corner transition (going to 190/55 will have to have lower pressure), my rear tyre last 6-8000 miles on road, 2 rear to a front. Not to say you would have the same because we are all different in weight and riding style but simply just stating with good suspension setup, you won't rely on tyres to do most of the job therefore you will have better tyre life and can run higher pressure for better lean-ability.

    This is just how i do it so like any advice on internet do at your own risk, please let me know if i got anything wrong or if its a better way; or if you are a pro and how you do it. always up for learning more :)
     
    #7 icedmind, Jul 7, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2020
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  8. Big A

    Big A New Member

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    Hello Lowside. Looking at your profile we live in the same town. Scratch what has been done and try Alpha Suspension in Leeds. Its actually Morley 20 minutes from us. £40 for setting up your suspension. It had transformed my bike completely. And he uses a tape measure!!! Seriously I was very impressed
     
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  9. Marc

    Marc Member

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  10. BladeOfGlory

    BladeOfGlory New Member

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    Interesting reading. Any got any suggestions for suspension set-up places in South-east? Hampshire/Sussex/Kent?
     
  11. dfw100

    dfw100 New Member

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    Tagg Racing near Ashford in Kent have a great reputation locally. No website but:

    https://www.yell.com/biz/tagg-racing-ltd-ashford-757938/
     
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  12. Jonno89

    Jonno89 New Member

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    Little further afield but my 600f was set up by MCT in Suffolk - again solid reputation and ohlins specialist (like most of them really) pricing was pretty competitive too
     
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